Cheryl Sleboda – Part 2

(Originally published January 2016, SCHMETZ Inspired to SEW #25. Written by Rita Farro.)

 

weekly_quilts

Cheryl’s Small Quilts 

Cheryl Sleboda had been doing traditional quilting for several years, but she’d created a sketch book, The Art of Fabric Manipulation, full of designs and ideas. She realized she was never going to be able to make that many large quilts. Besides — where would she put them? At that time (2005-6), ladies were working through an email list called Quilt Art. Once a month, they were doing 8.5” x 11” pieces. Although that project was coming to a close, it sparked the idea that she could work in a smaller format. She decided once a month was not enough time in her studio. Her goal was to be in her studio every day. So, she gave herself three simple rules:

  1. A finished quilt each week. The binding must be finished by Sunday night.
  2. Size was 6 x 6.
  3. Any design.

Cheryl created one small quilt every week for five years, changing the rules every year. During Year Two, she introduced a monthly theme:  Pomegranates, Monsters, Robots . . . that year, she started to develop a cartoony style.

Year 3:  She changed the size — instead of 6×6, she worked in 8×5 . . . and she started doing more technique work. Inspired by a 1996’s copy of Collette Wolf’s Fabric Manipulation book . . . each quilt had two different squares on it. Cheryl said, “Collette assumed her readers knew how to sew, so she left out the preparation or lead-up. I developed many short cuts that year.”


Print

Cheryl’s Advice to an Emerging Quilt Artist

If you want to build a business, your art must be seen. One way is to enter your work in a Quilt Show or a contest. All the major quilt shows have a “Call for Entry” heading on their websites.

Mancuso Quilt Shows
(https://www.quiltfest.com/):  Enter Competitions

Quilts, Inc.
(http://www.quilts.com/home/contests/index.php):   Entries

American Quilter’s Society (AQS)
(http://www.americanquilter.com/):  Contest Details

There are other websites that list “Fiber Art Calls For Entry.” When you find an event that feels like the right fit, the website will list the deadlines, the size requirements, themes, etc. Carefully read the prospectus and the contest rules. Most events or competitions want to see a good photograph of both sides of your quilt, along with a small detail shot. There is usually an entry fee.

Excellent advice about photographing your quilts can be found on the Quilts, Inc. website:

www.quilts.com/CallForEntries

 

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Cheryl Sleboda – Part 1

(Originally published January 2016, SCHMETZ Inspired to SEW #25. Written by Rita Farro.)

 

Cheryl Sleboda, SCHMETZ Inspired to SEW

Cheryl Sleboda

Cheryl Sleboda’s bio says:  I work in the comic book industry by day and am a fiber artist by night. I am fascinated by the intersection of technology and textiles. Juxtaposing heirloom techniques in modern quilts is part of my design aesthetic.

 

How did Cheryl become the quilting industry authority where technology meets quilting? Why make a six inch square quilt? How is she lighting up the world of art quilting?  

 

I grew up on the south side of Chicago. In 8th grade we moved to the suburbs. I learned to sew from Home EC classes! My grandmother gave me a sewing machine for Christmas my senior year of high school, but no one in my family sews but me.  I went to a local community college and majored in Theatre.  There I developed a love for costuming and for sewing.

In 1996 I met my soon-to-be-husband in the early days of the internet and moved to Baltimore. Soon after moving to Baltimore I started my full time job in the comic book industry. I work for a comic book distributor, and my job is to develop tools for customers to grow their businesses.  I work with small niche, passionate store owners every day.  I travel quite a bit for the job, attending major comic book conventions to meet with our clients and grow our industry.

Because I was so far away from family and friends I turned to sewing and picked up a JoAnn’s block of the month kit as my first introduction to quilting.  From there I started designing my own traditional style quilts and joined a quilt guild. I soon realized that I was going to run out of room for my quilts and worthy people to gift them to. Besides, making a bed-size quilt is a huge commitment in time, money and energy.

Cherl Sleboda Artists Trading Cards 2010

Artists Trading Cards 2010

In 2005-7 I started transitioning to art quilting. I started out making Artist Trading Card sized quilts (baseball card sized at 2.5 x 3.5 inches) and trading them with others on the internet. I was fascinated by journal quilting and wanted to start getting the art quilt ideas out of my sketchbook and made into work. So I launched my weekly art quilts in January 2007 and made one small (6×6 inch) art quilt every week for 5 years!

Road to Home Blue Ribbon Winner, 2009 Mancuso Pennsylvania Quilt Extravaganza

Road to Home
Blue Ribbon Winner
2009 Mancuso Pennsylvania Quilt Extravaganza

We moved from Baltimore to Chicago in the middle of 2007, so my quilts that year are very autobiographical.  

By doing that work for five years, I ended up teaching myself lots of design and art principles that serve me now with my current work. I developed a “style” of cartoony faces that are completely recognizable by others as my own. I think that if I didn’t do those quilts I would not nearly have honed my artistic voice as much as I have. It’s a great “journal” to be able to go back to see where it all started.  I also did one whole year of “Technique of the Week” which I documented on my YouTube channel (https://www.youtube.com/user/muppindotcom).

I had to make up some techniques just to get to 52 different ones. I like learning new things and trying new tools, so I plan to continue my video series in 2016 with a new season of Technique of the Week!

Two of Cheryl Sleboda's weekly quilts from Year 3.

Two of Cheryl’s weekly quilts from Year 3.

Every year, I would change my own rules. In Year 3 (2009) of my weekly series, I did a group of quilts based on heirloom sewing and fabric manipulation. This has become one of the things I most enjoy. I made a quilt with 44 different fabric manipulation techniques in it. That quilt was the inspiration for my DVD “Heirloom Sewing Techniques for Today’s Quilter.” I do these techniques by both hand and machine, and I now have a plastic template for people who want to do the heirloom Canadian smocking techniques.

Another thing I am known for is for lighting up my quilts. In 2010,  the very first “Technique of the Week” weekly quilt went viral . . . I used conductive thread in a quilt. Conductive thread  conducts electricity like wire. I made a bunch of quilts that are inspired by underwater life, as lots of creatures under the sea have a natural bioluminescence. No one was lighting up quilts at the time, and even now, it’s not for everyone, but I feel like I have been there from the early days of the technology. Now there are computer chips to program your lights that can be programmed from your cell phone. I started selling Light Up kits on my website and I’m now the quilting world’s eTextile expert, I guess!

 

“Geschwindigkeit (Speed)” Judge’s Choice - Mancuso Quiltfest Destination Savannah 2014

“Geschwindigkeit (Speed)”
Judge’s Choice – Mancuso Quiltfest Destination Savannah 2014

A couple of years ago I drew a skull and crossed thread-and-needle design while on a phone call at work. I loved it so much, I turned the design into a t-shirt. Next thing you know, my friends all wanted one. My husband had been out of work for over a year and I realized that there was money to be made, so a new side business was born. With the last $300 in our savings, we started selling shirts, and reinvested our profits back into the business. We developed other designs for shirts, patches, mugs, stickers, sweatshirts and much more. These are now available to quilt shops through distributors, launching with Checker in early 2015. Since I work for a distributor in comics, it’s a bit full-circle. This income and my quilting teaching income supplemented my full time income until my husband returned to work in 2014. All of my products are available through my online store at  http://shop.muppin.com.

As an extension of what I do for the comic book industry, I started giving people advice on their art businesses. Early in 2015 my friend Lynn and I did a recorded webinar about how to launch an art business. I have since written, taught, and lectured about business topics for quilt businesses on branding, time management, social media, and much more!
 
So I work full time, and I feel like I work full time on my art business too.  Since the move back to the Chicago area, I get to work out of my house, so I know I am incredibly lucky. I try to sew at least an hour a day in some fashion, with much more on the weekends. My goal is to make at least two large quilts for entry into quilt competitions each year. I also work on lots of small projects throughout the year. I have my business social media and other marketing plans worked out to be done in a very tight schedule, so I don’t get burned out. I teach and lecture to quilt guilds, and I love doing that. I have a huge bucket list of things I haven’t done yet, like write a book or design fabric, but I have lots of time ahead of me to get those accomplished. When I put my mind to it, anything is possible. I love what I do!

www.muppin.com
 

 
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The History and Impact of 4-H

(Originally published in SCHMETZ Inspired to SEW #76.)

 

Since 4-H began more than 100 years ago, it has become the nation’s largest youth development organization. The 4-H idea is simple: help young people and their families gain the skills needed to be proactive forces in their communities and develop ideas for a more innovative economy.

In the late 1800s, adults in the farming community did not readily accept new agricultural developments. But university researchers discovered young people were open to new thinking and would experiment with new ideas and share their experiences with adults.

The passage of the Smith-Lever Act in 1914 created the Cooperative Extension System at USDA and nationalized 4-H. By 1924, 4-H clubs were formed and the clover emblem was adopted. The four H’s stand for Head, Heart, Hands, and Health.

Chances are, even if you were never a member, your life has been impacted by 4-H in many ways, especially if you love to sew.

For starters, if not for 4-H, we might never have known Nancy Zieman. Can you imagine a world without 30 years of Sewing with Nancy?

 

Click HERE to read the full story on ISSUU.com.

The Art of Homemaking Exhibit

(Originally published in SCHMETZ Inspired to SEW #73.)

 

Every month, Rita Farro gets to write for SCHMETZ Inspired to SEW. She loves telling other people’s stories. The whole point of SCHMETZ Inspired to SEW magazine is, of course, to revel in this hobby we love . . . to inspire YOU to sew!

In this issue, Rita shares her own story, a remarkable exhibit, and a thoughtful look back at the homemakers who came before us.

Here’s the press release she sent in November 2019:

**********

Homemaking: A mostly North American term to describe the creation and management of a home, especially as a pleasant place in which to live.

In 2002, Rita Farro turned her love of vintage bed linens into a book, Dress Your Dream Bed (Vintage Linen Inspirations for Today’s Elegant Bed). Rita is an avid collector of many things. Besides bed linens, she also loves (and collects) aprons, spooners, toast racks, embroidered linens, cookbooks, Singer Featherweight sewing machines, 7-Day-a-Week Dishtowels, napkin rings, quilts, cross-stitch samplers, and, well, you get the idea.

What began as a love of vintage bed linens became an obsession with homemaking arts. Through the end of January 2020, Farro will curate an exhibit of her personal collections at the beautiful library in Bettendorf, Iowa. She is calling her exhibit The Art of Homemaking. Her intention is to fill both floors of this stunning library building. Every showcase and/or blank wall space will be celebrating The Art of Homemaking.

Farro says, This exhibit is about what women have done, through generations, to make their home a welcoming haven for their family and friends. It’s about the love they put into setting the table or making the family beds. The traditions they create by using Grandma’s soup tureen on Christmas Eve or Aunt Rozella’s silver for Sunday dinners. Every homemaker hopes their personal family traditions will create lasting memories for their loved ones.

Homemaking is an art, and every woman has her own way of doing things. This exhibit features some ordinary and extraordinary handiwork of mostly anonymous homemakers.

*********

So, you might be asking yourself, “how on earth did Rita come to own all those tubs full of vintage linens?”

To answer that question, she has to take you back to 1996.

Click HERE to read the full story at ISSUU.com.

 

Susanne M. Jones – Fly Me to the Moon

SCHMETZ Inspired to SEW is always seeking insight into that moment of inspiration . . . when a woman (or a man) is compelled to create using needle and thread. Everybody takes a different path — and sewing means different things to different people. No two stories are the same. This month, we introduce you to Susanne M. Jones. After teaching elementary school in Maryland and Virginia for 25 years, she launched into a new career as a curator of museum quality quilt exhibits — and nobody could be more surprised than Susanne herself. We’ll let her tell her story . . . .

While I was looking forward to retirement and being free of the demands of full-time work, I knew I would miss my colleagues. My friend, Lisa Ellis, suggested that I consider quilting and join a guild where I would find like-minded, kind people. Since I always had some sort of needle and thread in my hands, it seemed a natural fit. So I started taking classes about a year before retirement. I totally intended to make very traditional baby quilts and lap quilts.

In 2012 I joined the Sacred Threads Committee and helped plan the 2013 show. Sacred Threads conveys the spirituality, healing, and inspirational message that transcends all people. All of the committee members were art quilters except me. I never considered myself an artist, although looking back I can see that color, texture, and composition have always been important to me and have given me pleasure, even during my teaching career. I loved doing bulletin boards and making educational games for the kids.

Seeing Our Stories Clearly with 20/20 Hindsight.

Seeing Our Stories Clearly with 20/20 Hindsight.

I joined Quilters Unlimited in Northern Virginia and became very involved in the Reston Chapter. I served as Program Chair, Vice President, and President. I became involved in the Quilt Alliance (again at Lisa’s suggestion) and made a piece for their TWENTY contest in 2013. It was my first art quilt, Seeing Our Stories Clearly with 20/20 Hindsight. I really had fun making it, and I was floored when it won a Judge’s Choice from Marianne Fons!

That’s Life

That’s Life

As we neared the start of the 2013 Sacred Threads Exhibition, the committee members were asked to make a small piece to hang in the gathering area outside of the exhibit. I made That’s Life, my second art quilt in a game format and it focused on the life transitions that I had gone through in the past 18 months: Retirement, the death of my mom and father-in-law, becoming empty nesters, moving to a condo, and two joint replacement surgeries. It was created using a jigsaw appliqué technique that I learned from Cheryl Almgren Taylor.

During Sacred Threads, I met Donna DeSoto, author, and curator of Inspired by the Beatles. She had a Beatles song that needed an artist, so I took on the challenge. My quilt was Rain, and it was published in Donna’s book and was part of the special exhibit at the 2014 Houston International Quilt Festival.

I was hooked.

Susanne M. Jones and husband Todd.

Susanne M. Jones and husband Todd.

In July of 2014, my husband Todd and I were watching a story about the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing and moonwalk. I commented that the 50th anniversary of that landing would make a cool collection of quilts. My ever-encouraging husband said that I should put out a call for such a collection. Not knowing what to expect, I put out the call. The call was shared via social media and went global. The Fly Me to the Moon (FMTTM) collection juried by Lisa Ellis and Cyndi Souder has 179 quilts by artists from eight countries. It premiered at the Houston International Quilt Festival in 2016, and the book is available on Amazon.

https://smile.amazon.com/Fly-Me-Moon-Quilt-Journey/dp/0764354000/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1521666175&sr=8-1&keywords=fly+me+to+the+moon+and+art+quilt+journey

Fly Me to the Moon has blessed me with experiences I could never have imagined. NASA hung eight of the FMTTM quilts for the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 1 tragedy. Space Center Houston had a special exhibit entitled Space for Art. Four of the artists from FMTTM were invited to exhibit their work in that show. I attended the gala opening and renewed my acquaintance with astronaut Nicole Stott who wrote the foreword for Fly Me to the Moon: An Art Quilt Journey. I also met Karen Nyberg, the first astronaut to quilt in space. In between those events I was able to visit Webster Presbyterian Church, the Astronaut Church, where Buzz Aldrin attended at the time of Apollo 11. He took communion on the moon in radio silence, making it the first food or drink consumed there. I got to hold that chalice in my hand. Who could have imagined? From July 10 – September 25, 2017, 61 of the FMTTM quilts were hanging in the sanctuary of Webster Presbyterian Church.

None of this would have been possible without the FMTTM collection, and none of it would have ever happened without my dear husband, Todd. While I may be the CEO of Susanne Miller Jones, LLC, Todd is the CEE — Chief of Everything Else. A retired engineer, he has become a wonderful textile photographer and has taken all of the photos for Fly Me To The Moon. At any exhibit, he is just as excited as I am about the quilts and the artists.

Fly Me To The Moon started me on quite a journey. I now have three calls out there. FMTTM was followed by HERstory: A Celebration of Strong Women. There are 107 art quilts by artists from seven countries in that collection. Fifty-two of the HERstory quilts are premiering at the 2017 International Quilt Festival in Houston, Texas in November.

My most recent call for entries was OURstory: Human Rights Stories in Fabric, telling the stories of disenfranchised people and their fights for equal rights. All groups and issues were welcomed in this collection. Artists were invited to make a 25” x 40” quilt about any discrimination or violation of human rights.

http://www.susannemjones.com/ourstory-collection-announced/

When people ask how I decided to start my own business, I say I didn’t mean to do it. But as the calls kept coming and exhibitions needed to be shipped and written about, a business was needed to corral it all. Every step along this journey has been accompanied by huge learning curves. Building a business is no exception. Even though making money would be great, my mission statement has much more to do with the human components.

My goal is to highlight the work of the artists who have trusted me with their work. When I’m putting together an exhibition, I find myself wearing the hats of artist, cheerleader, curator, author, and marketer. Some weeks I only work to spread the call for entries. Facebook has been a wonderful tool for that. As each call goes out, I start a SECRET Facebook page for the artists. It is a place where the artists get to know each other, run ideas by each other and share progress on their pieces. I lurk in the background and watch the art happen. Other weeks, I’m editing books, looking for venues or promoting the exhibits. Whatever I do, only one thing is on my mind: Make the artists and their work shine!

Although I did not think it was possible, I am busier now than I was when I was working full-time. It often feels like there are not enough hours in the day. It is a wonderful thing to feel like the work you do is making a difference. My life verse is, “I can do all things through Christ who gives me strength.” (Philippians 4:13) My church, Floris United Methodist Church, in Herndon, VA (which is where Sacred Threads holds its bi-annual exhibit) has a partnership with the Child Rescue Center in Sierra Leone. Several times a year we send a mission team to work with the children, who are in residence there. The children live in family units with an “auntie” in charge of each family home. Last year I was selected to go on the Drama, Music and Art team which we named CREATE. My assignment was to teach Bible stories to the younger children. I was introduced to the aunties as a quilter, and their eyes lit up.

Imagine my surprise when they asked me to fix their sewing machines. They were treadle machines! I emailed Todd, asking him to research the manuals for these Butterfly treadles. Eventually, we were able to get the machines in working order and I taught basic maintenance: How to change a needle, how to change the tension, how to wind and insert a bobbin, and how to thread the machine. The kids brought in stacks of mending. Recently they posted a photo of one of those kids getting a sewing award!

What is most inspiring about Susanne’s story is how open she was to a new chapter in her life. She brought her teaching experience, combined it with her love of sewing and crafting, then dove, head first, into the world of art quilt exhibitions. She met new people, experimented with new techniques, saw a need, then filled it. Her natural ability as a problem solver combined with her creative side to create something beyond her wildest retirement dreams.